Category: Social Media Monitoring

12 Jun

2018 Survey Results: Social Media use of College Student Athletes

Kevin DeShazo Leadership, Social Media Education, Social Media Monitoring Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

How and why do college athletes use social media? For the last 8 years, we’ve traveled the country to help them use it with purpose and positivity. We’ve been on more than 170 campuses and educated over 100,000 student-athletes. We’ve had conversations about career development, cyberbullying, mental health, brand building and more.

5 years ago, we decided to go deeper, surveying collegiate athletes at every level about their social media use. You can see results from 201320142015, 2016 and 2017. This year we had over 2000 student-athletes participate. This information is useful for administrators, to help you understand how and why this generation of athletes uses social media, but it is also helpful for us. This data also informs how we structure our sessions and messages to student-athletes, in order to be relevant and connect with them in a way that has a true impact. This is how we have become and continue to be the most trusted resource when it comes to educating student-athletes on social media use, and why more than 170 programs have utilized our services in the past 8 years to educate, equip and empower college athletics on social media.

The reality is that social media use is not going away and there is still a significant need for social media education. There’s a tendency to believe that because this generation of athletes has grown up with social media, that they know how to use it well. For most, that simply isn’t the case. Understanding how and why to use social media well only comes through intentional education from someone who actually understands and uses social media as well as the mindset and habits of not just college students, but college student-athletes.

Here are the results of our 2018 survey on the social media use of college athletes.

Participants: 2136

Level of competition
NAIA: 5%
D3: 10%
D2: 13%
D1: 72%

Male: 32%
Female: 68%

Facebook
98% have an account
53% say they use it less than they did one year ago
32% check it at least 5 times per day, without posting
98% post less than 5 times per day
92% use it to keep up with friends and family
79% use it for entertainment
30% use it to get updates on news
15% use it for school work
62% have more than 500 Facebook friends
32% have posted something inappropriate (profanity, racial, sexual, drugs/alcohol, violence)
77% utilize Facebook’s privacy settings
83% “like” a brand page on Facebook

Twitter
95% have an account
62% check it more than 5 times per day, without tweeting
46% tweet between 1- 5 times per day
7% tweet more than 10 times per day
39% have more than 500 followers
67% have a public account
38% use it for entertainment
46% use it to get news updates
31% use it to connect with friends and family
7% have shared personal information on Twitter (phone number, email address, etc)
27% have tweeted something inappropriate (profanity, racial, sexual, drugs/alcohol, violence)
8% have received hateful/critical tweets from fans
3% have responded to hateful/critical tweets from fans
78% follow a brand on Twitter

Instagram
99% have an account
84% have a private account
46% check it more than 10 times per day, without posting
39% check it between 5 and 10 times per day, without posting
93% post between 1 and 5 times per day
100% use it to keep up with friends and family
84% use it for entertainment
31% use it to get updates on news
8% have posted something inappropriate (profanity, racial, sexual, drugs/alcohol, violence)
11% have a Finstagram (fake/secondary Instagram account)
83% follow a brand on Instagram

Snapchat
93% have an account
67% send more than 10 snaps per day
39% use it to stay updated on news
85% use it for entertainment
84% use it to keep up with friends and family
62% have posted something inappropriate (profanity, racial, sexual, drugs/alcohol, violence)
40% have posted something inappropriate during this last school year
9% have sent snaps to someone they don’t know
61% have received snaps from someone they don’t know
67% have more than 50 friends on Snapchat
61% believe Snapchat is private
13% follow a brand on Snapchat

Which social media platform do you use the most?
Instagram: 46%
Snapchat: 31%
Twitter: 15%
Facebook: 8%

Which social media platform is your favorite?
Instagram: 53%
Snapchat: 23%
Twitter: 15%
Facebook: 8%

In addition to Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat, what social media platforms do you regularly use?
Facebook Messenger: 85%
Pinterest: 23%
LinkedIn: 46%
Tinder: 18%
Tumblr: 7%

71% spend at least 1 hour per day on social media
32% spend more than 2 hours per day on social media
96% said they receive mostly positive comments on social media
85% said overall, social media has a positive impact on their life
49% say they’ve had no social media training
33% say they’ve posted something online they regret
23% have witnessed a teammate being cyber-bullied on social media
31% have checked social media during one of their games
8% have posted to social media during one of their games
39% believe their social media activity is being monitored by their athletics department
15% have been disciplined by a coach or administrator for a social media post
13% have engaged in a romantic relationship online
70% have met someone offline that they first interacted with on social media
31% have used social media to network for a job or internship

Fieldhouse Media is an award-winning firm dedicated to helping athletics departments get the most out of their social media efforts, from educating student-athletes and staff to providing an overall strategy. To find out more about us or to join the more than 170 schools utilizing our services for their athletics department, contact us today.

12 Jan

Fieldhouse Media at the 2015 NCAA Convention

Kevin DeShazo Social Media Education, Social Media Monitoring, Social Media Strategy Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

2015 is here and it’s off to a fast start. The NCAA Convention is this week in our nation’s capital. Making the trip? We’d love to see you! Mike Koehler – one of our brilliant social media minds who helps us create effective social media strategies for athletics departments – will be serving on a panel about using social media to your advantage in a crisis. While we all hope and pray that a crisis never hits the doorsteps of our department, it’s necessary to have a plan in place in the event that this becomes reality. Social Media can be a critical resource during this time, from listening to response to advocacy. Make it work for you.

Details on the session
Crisis Communication: How to use social media to your advantage
When: Thursday from 1:15-2:15
Location: Woodrow Wilson Ballroom A
Open to all

If you’ll be there, let us know!

 

Fieldhouse Media is an award-winning firm dedicated to helping athletics departments get the most out of their social media efforts, from educating student-athletes and staff to providing an overall strategy. To find out more about us or to join the more than 70 schools utilizing our services for their athletics department, contact us today.

12 Apr

Fieldhouse Media Earns Innovator of the Year Award

Kevin DeShazo Social Media Monitoring Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

Oklahoma City, OK (April 12, 2013) Last night, Fieldhouse Media founder Kevin DeShazo was honored as an Innovator of the Year by the Journal Record. He received this honor for FieldTrack, the social media monitoring platform that Fieldhouse Media offers to university athletic departments. Launched in 2012, FieldTrack provides athletic departments with a non-invasive alternative to monitoring the social media activity of their student athletes and coaches. Explains DeShazo, “I looked at some of the other options available and, as a parent, these weren’t services that I would be comfortable being used for my child. So I got with our development team and said there has to be a better way to do this. There has to be a non-invasive way to approach monitoring. A way that will lead to better communication between staff and student athlete, a way that will facilitate education. With FieldTrack, we’ve done that.”

 

FIELDHOUSE MEDIA FOUNDER KEVIN DESHAZO ACCEPTS THE AWARD FOR INNOVATOR OF THE YEAR
FIELDHOUSE MEDIA FOUNDER KEVIN DESHAZO ACCEPTS THE AWARD FOR INNOVATOR OF THE YEAR

 

A web-based platform, FieldTrack monitors the public Twitter accounts of student athletes and staff, searching for potentially offensive and inappropriate words that could damage the reputation of the student-athlete, team, and university. Unlike other platforms, FieldTrack has no apps for student athletes and staff to install on their accounts, and never accesses private information. FieldTrack also works as an app on iOS (iPhone, iPad) and Android devices, giving administrators a real-time view of what is happening online.

“Our development team put together an incredible product that looks great, is easy to use, and provides a valuable service to an athletic department. The most satisfying thing is seeing the impact that FieldTrack is having. Programs that are utilizing both FieldTrack and our on-site social media education sessions, are seeing a 41% daily drop in offensive/inappropriate tweets (*update October 2013: this number is now at 62%). Student athletes are realizing the power of social media, and the need to create a positive online identity.”

About Fieldhouse Media: Founded in 2011, Fieldhouse Media is a leader in social media education and monitoring for student-athletes. With the perspective that social media is a valuable and powerful tool, Fieldhouse Media partners with athletic departments to educate student-athletes on how to use social media in a positive way. Through FieldTrack, they monitor social media activity to help protect the online image of student-athletes. Fieldhouse Media has partnered with over 30 university athletic departments, and has been featured in the New York Times, ESPN.com, USA Today and a number of other national news outlets. Founder Kevin DeShazo has presented at a number of events, including the NCAA Convention, CoSIDA, and the Collegiate Athletics Leadership Symposium.

To learn more about Fieldhouse Media, contact them at:

info@fieldhousemedia.net 405.535.6943

10 Apr

Debate Heats Up Over Social Media Privacy of Student Athletes

Kevin DeShazo Social Media Monitoring Tags: , , , 0 Comments

Over the last 18 months, the debate over the social media privacy of student athletes has heated up, beginning when Maryland became the first state to introduce legislation that would protect online privacy. That bill failed, but has since been re-introduced.

Since that time, California, Delaware, MichiganNew JerseyNew MexicoUtahArkansas, Oregon, Illinois andWisconsin have all passed and signed bills to protect the online privacy of students/student-athletes. Several other states (Kansas, Texas, Iowa, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Minnesota, Louisiana, Rhode Island, North Carolina and Hawaii, to name a few) have similar bills pending.

Even the federal government is getting involved, as they have reintroduced the Social Networking Online Protection Act (SNOPA).

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19 Jan

Manti Te’o, Social Media and Student-Athletes. What now?

Kevin DeShazo Social Media Education, Social Media Monitoring Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

Much has been made of the Manti Te’o situation. With him being the face of Notre Dame football this season, that is to be expected. I wanted to wait until we heard his side, which we now have, before choosing to write about it, and what it means for student-athletes on social media, and how universities/athletic departments approach it.

This post won’t be about whether or not his story is believable. It won’t be a story judging his character.

For those unfamiliar, (former) Notre Dame LB Manti Te’o was the apparent victim of an internet hoax referred to as Catfishing – when a person pretends they are someone they are not, usually on social media, in order to deceive someone. Most of you will remember his trying season, when in the span of a few hours he lost his Grandmother and girlfriend. It was an incredible narrative. Now it turns out that his girlfriend, who he “met” online, was in fact not real. Never existed. Fittingly, news of the story as I was sitting on a panel at theNCAA Convention, discussing student-athletes and social media.

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