Tag: social media training

29 Dec

What did 2015 look like for Fieldhouse Media?

Kevin DeShazo Social Media Education, Social Media Strategy Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

 

As we head full speed into a new year, it’s always good to step back and reflect on the previous year. To understand where we’ve come from, where we are, and where we’re going. And, hopefully, to celebrate. Thanks to you, 2015 brought us many reasons to celebrate.

 

Social Media Education/Training

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02 Dec

Why Kirk Herbstreit’s advice to coaches about student athletes using social media is wrong

Kevin DeShazo Social Media Education Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Kirk Herbstreit, in my opinion, is one of the best analysts in college football. He knows his stuff, he relates well to fans, he let’s you know where he stands, and he has fun. I’m a big fan. That said, Kirk – and the media members, coaches and administrators who agree with him – needs to re-evaluate his position on student-athletes using social media. Kirk went on ESPN Radio this morning on the Mike & Mike show. When asked what advice he would give to coaches, he had this to say (courtesy of 247 Sports):

“My recommendation in the future for all coaches – and I don’t know if you could control this – is get players away from social media; college players,” Herbstreit said. “Because what I find is it’s counterproductive. And I know it’s freedom of speech and you guys should get on this topic some time. And I don’t know how you’d control it. But I’ve never seen a team as active as Ohio State on social media and kind of going back-and-forth, whether it’s the fans, or media, or whatever it might be.

“You can say it doesn’t affect you, but at the end of the day it does. I would do everything in my power if I were a coach in today’s climate to say, ‘Hey guys, camp starts August 1 and your phones and social media, they get put on the sidelines until we’re done playing. You’re not going to engage. You’re not going to get involved. Because there’s nothing good that comes out of that.’

“I think in some weird way, that may have had some sort of impact on Ohio State, because those guys, they were tweeting more than they were practicing it seemed like sometimes. Those guys were really, really active – and kind of cute – on social media. And they need to put that away. All teams, in my mind, needs to put that stuff away.”

“It’s not always what they tweet out and what they send, it’s what they read and what people can say to them is the thing I have a problem with.”

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04 Nov

3 Questions for Student Athletes to Ask Before Posting on Social Media

Kevin DeShazo Social Media Education Tags: , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Many things keep administrators up at night. One of those things, not surprisingly, is what their student-athletes are doing online. “What are they posting? Who will see it? Will I get an email at 2:00 in the morning about it? Will I wake up to find one of our players on Deadspin for something she tweeted?”

What players post is out of the control of administrators and coaches – no matter what policies you have in place. It’s one of the main reasons social media education is so important. Given how much time college students spend online, and how much of a magnifying glass is on what student-athletes post, we must be intentional to educate, equip and empower them to use it well.

In our leadership sessions with teams and departments, we use a tool to decrease gossip and drama. It’s a visual tool that asks 3 questions. 

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03 Aug

The Social Media “Drill” – Teaching the Power of Positive Social Media with One Exercise

Kevin DeShazo Social Media Education Tags: , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Today we have a guest post from our friend Morgan Crutchfield. Morgan is a writer and photographer who studies the dynamics of social media and sports. Find her on Twitter @CentralMorgan. Enjoy!

Social Media can be a scary thing to tackle as a coach; the need to address athletes’ social media usage may be overwhelmed by fear of failure to cover all the issues or intimidation related to opening a Pandora’s Box by talking about social at all. Attempts to create guidelines start to look like exercises in making long lists of don’ts and the ever-changing landscape of apps and platforms seems to create more work and more room for error. But as we learn more about athletes’ relationships with their teammates and peers, we’re learning that a restrictive social media plan is not only not effective for teams, it fails to capitalize on the power of positive social.

While there is certainly value in setting boundaries with your players and possibly even providing examples of social media disasters to prove the point, educating on what not to do should only be a small part of the plan. Because while social media can be a gateway to some exceptionally negative consequences for athletes who use it only as a megaphone for poorly thought-out posts, it can also be an incredibly powerful set of tools to help athletes build both team unity and self image.

Where should you start? Like any skill on the field, wise social media use starts with practice, so I’ve developed a “drill” that will help your athletes understand how to use social media for good and at the same time will utilize the networks they’re on for hours at a time .

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09 Mar

Social Media Use of Student Athletes: 2015 Survey Results [infographic]

Kevin DeShazo Social Media Education, Social Media Strategy Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

Last week we published the results of our latest survey, looking at the social media use of college athletes. With nearly 1000 participants, the data gave us a good look into where this group is spending their time online. There are a few takeaways from the data as it relates to both the education of student-athletes on social media and how we reach this audience from a marketing and communications perspective.

In terms of education, we’re seeing that 43% spend more than an hour on social media each day with 37% of them saying they’ve posted something regret. Meanwhile, 45 have had zero training/education on social media use. This plays out in that 48% believe Yik Yak is anonymous and 41% have posted something inappropriate on Snapchat, which implies that they believe that it is private and pictures actually disappear.

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02 Mar

Social Media Use of Student Athletes: 2015 Survey Results

Kevin DeShazo Social Media Education, Social Media Strategy Tags: , , , , , , , , , 1 Comment

Over the last few weeks we’ve been compiling data on our third annual survey looking at the social media use of collegiate student-athletes (can see the results from our 2013 survey here and 2014 here). This isn’t a perfect science but it does allow us a good look into how college athletes use social media. This helps us be more effective in our social media education and training sessions, and also provides valuable insight as we help athletics departments craft social media strategies.

This year we had nearly 1000 student-athletes participate. We owe a huge thanks to the administrators who passed on the survey and encouraged their student-athletes to take it, and of course to those who took the time to fill it out.

Here are the results of our 2015 survey on the social media use of student-athletes:

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22 Dec

A look back at 2014

Kevin DeShazo Social Media Education, Social Media Strategy Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

Thanks to you, 2014 was our best year yet. From January to December, you’ve kept us busy and we’ve loved every minute. How busy? Let’s look:

  • We traveled more than 45,000 miles
  • Visited over 40 campuses and conferences in 15 states (many thanks to Southwest and Delta for getting us to and fro safely)
  • Educated more than 25,000 student-athletes, coaches and administrators about how to use social media well
  • Helped programs from every level – NAIA up to the Power 5 conferences – see direct, measurable results from developing and executing effective social media strategies across a variety of platforms
  • Launched Fieldhouse Leadership to help develop leaders worth following in collegiate athletics
So thank you. Thank you for believing that social media education for your student-athletes and staff is worth investing in. That they are worth investing in, so that they can better represent themselves and your department online.. Thank you for believing that there is a better way to tell your story online, that your fans deserve the best content and that your team – with the right road map – is capable of creating it.Thank you for choosing Fieldhouse Media. It means the world to us. We love serving the collegiate athletics community, and are grateful for the many of you we get to not only call clients, but friends.

2014 was special but we’re just getting started. Let’s continue to change the game in 2015, together.

Fieldhouse Media is an award-winning firm dedicated to helping athletics departments get the most out of their social media efforts, from educating student-athletes and staff to providing an overall strategy. To find out more about us or to join the more than 70 schools utilizing our services for their athletics department, contact us today.

02 Sep

On Social Media, Student Athletes Need Models Instead of Critics

Kevin DeShazo Leadership, Social Media Education Tags: , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Student-Athletes have a lot of critics. From fans to media to opponents, even parents and coaches can, at times, be critics. It seems everyone has an opinion on what they should do. When it comes to shaping behavior, what they really need are models. Critics tell them what not to do, while models show them what to do. Critics call them out, models call them up to what they’re capable of being.

At practice, coaches spend a significant amount of time reinforcing good technique, good habits, good decisions. If you continually tell a player to not drop the pass, they end up focusing so much on not dropping the pass that, of course, they drop the pass. There’s so much tension and anxiety around not screwing up.

Instead, we coach them on what needs to happen in order to reach the desired goal of catching the pass. We focus on good route-running skills, timing and proper hand position. When they drop it, we step out and show them how it’s done so that they can see it. They can visualize it. We model the right way to do it. Then we send them back out to practice it over and over until it becomes second nature to simply catch the pass. The fear of dropping it is no longer there.

When it comes to social media, too often we are doing the exact opposite. We are coaching them on what not to do, continually criticizing their poor behavior and decisions. We bring in speakers who are unfamiliar with social media, who only know the negative side of it and try to instill in them a fear of messing up. We have coaches who don’t use the platforms preaching that same message. They only thing they know about social media is what not to do. When that’s all you are focused on, you are bound to slip up.

What student-athletes need on social media are models. Someone to guide them on how to use social media well, to help them develop goals for their social media use. Leaders who can explain what that looks like and why that matters. Someone who uses it often and can show them how powerful social media can be when used with a purpose. They need coaches, staff members, people in the community and business world to follow online who can show them what it means to use social media for more than just talking to your friends. People they can learn from and model their social media behavior after.

As educators, it is our job to model. To preach purpose over fear. To prepare them for success online. We have the opportunity to shape how they view and use social media. Are we taking the best approach?

To quote John Wooden, “young people need models, not critics.

Fieldhouse Media is an award-winning firm dedicated to helping athletics departments get the most out of their social media efforts, from educating student-athletes and staff to providing an overall strategy. To find out more about us or to join the more than 130 schools utilizing our services for their athletics department, contact us today.

 

11 Feb

6 tips for student-athletes to utilize social media in their job search

Kevin DeShazo Social Media Education Tags: , , , 0 Comments

The topic of how companies use social media in screening applicants isn’t a new one. We know that 94% of companies use social media in the recruiting process. Craig Pintens, Oregon’s Senior Associate AD of Marketing/Public Relations, recently tweeted that they eliminated a candidate in their search for an Assistant AD based on what they found on Twitter.

Social Media job impact

So how can student-athletes use social media in the job search? Not just to avoid having their resumé thrown in the trash, but to stand out in a positive way? To show employers that they are reliable, trustworthy, have integrity and fit into their workplace culture? You can teach a new employee almost any skill, from marketing to accounting to sales, but you can’t teach character and how to make good decisions. Things that employers can learn about you from your social media presence.

We had a great session with a group of senior student-athletes recently on how they can use social media in the job search, and thought it was worth sharing those tips from that discussion.

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13 Jan

For Student Athletes on Social Media, It’s Not About Wrong vs Right

Kevin DeShazo Social Media Education Tags: , , , 0 Comments

We’ve talked before about how social media education for student-athletes isn’t about tweet this, not that. Coming at it from a right or wrong approach is one of the quickest ways to make sure your message goes in one ear and out the other.

Remember the last time you were lectured about what was right and wrong? Odds are you tuned it out quickly. Unfortunately, this is the only message many student-athletes have heard when it comes to social media.

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